Few injuries can be more difficult to recover from than a spinal cord injury. As you recover and get used to the new normal, you may start to wonder what will happen if you can no longer continue in your previous career. While a personal injury claim may help in the short term by ensuring that you receive the financial compensation for your injury that you deserve, sometimes, that award is not enough for day-to-day expenses. The financial pressures of your medical care combined with the loss of income can add up to a frightening amount.

While there are still many lucrative and fulfilling career options open to you, you may want to consider applying for Social Security supplemental income. In 2018, over 500,000 Texans received Social Security benefits due to a disability. This safety net can offer a monthly income to offset the immediate financial concerns while you pivot into a new job path.

How do I qualify for Social Security supplemental income? 

To receive Social Security Disability, you must meet specific criteria, including:

  • Show proof of United States citizenship.
  • Have evidence of a qualifying disability that prevents you from continuing in your previous line of work.
  • Have evidence that your disability will last longer than one year.

Typically, spinal cord injuries qualify for this aid. Medical records and test results can help strengthen your case with the Social Security Administration.

How long with the SSI last?

Once the Social Security Administration approves your application, you may continue to receive this supplemental income as long as you do not earn more than $1,200 a month. There are also return to work incentive programs that can help you test your ability to return to the workforce while keeping your monthly supplemental income benefit for a short period.

If you are dealing with a catastrophic injury, consult with a lawyer to make sure you know about all your options in and out of the workforce.